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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Weeks later, I was also told that after the inspector general reviewed the C.I.A.'s activities to the Department of Justice --, excuse me, referred the C.I.A.'s activities to the Department of Justice, the acting counsel general of the C.I.A. filed a crimes report with the Department of Justice concerning the committee staff's actions. I have not been provided the specifics of these allegations or been told whether the department has initiated a criminal investigation based on the allegations of the C.I.A.'s acting general counsel.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Our staff involved in this matter have the appropriate clearances, handled the sensitive material according to established procedures and practice to protect classified information, and were provided access to the Panetta Review by the C.I.A. itself. As a result, there is no legitimate reason to allege to the Justice Department that Senate staff may have committed a crime. I view the acting Counsel General's referral as a potential effort to intimidate this staff, and I am not taking it lightly.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: the staff members who have been working on this study and this report have devoted years of their lives to it, wading through the horrible details of a C.I.A. program that never, never, never should have existed. They have worked long hours and produced a report unprecedented in its comprehensive attention to detail in the history of the Senate. They are now being threatened with legal jeopardy just as the final revisions to the report are being made so that parts of it can be declassified and released to the American people.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: I also want to reiterate to my colleagues my desire to have all updates to the committee report completed this month and approved for declassification. We're not going to stop. I intend to move to have the findings conclusions and the executive summary of the report sent to the President for declassification and release to the American people. The White House has indicated publicly and to me personally that it supports declassification and release. If the Senate can declassify this report, we will be able to ensure that an un-American, brutal program of detention and interrogation will never again be considered or permitted.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Mr. President, the recent actions that I have just laid out make this a defining moment for the oversight of our intelligence committee. How Congress and how this will be resolved will show whether the intelligence committee can be effective in monitoring and investigating our nation's intelligence activities, or whether our work can be thwarted by those we oversee. I believe it is critical that the committee and the Senate reaffirm our oversight role and our independence under the constitution of the United States. Mr. President, I thank you very much for your patience and I yield the floor.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Leahy: I’ve had the privilege of serving in this body now my 40th -- 40th year. I've heard thousands of speeches on this floor. I cannot think of any speech by any member of either party as important as the one the Senator from California just gave. What she is saying is if we're going to protect the separation of powers and the concept of congressional oversight, then she has taken the right steps to do that.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Leahy: I think back, Mr. President, the very first vote i cast in this body was for the Church Committee, which went into the excesses of the C.I.A. and others of our agencies, everything from assassinations, to spying on those who were protesting the war in Vietnam. There was a famous George Tames picture, where then chairman of the armed services committee, John Stennis was berating Senator Frank Church for proposing this committee saying that he, Senator Stennis, could find out what he wanted to find out but didn't really want to know everything. I was standing behind George Stennis when he took that picture in my first caucus.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Leahy: There was pressure on our junior members, new members, I was the most junior member of the senate at the time, not to vote for the Church Committee. Senator Mike Mansfield told me, as Senator Fritz Mondale, as did others, that the Senate is bigger than any one senator. We come and go. The Senate lasts. If we do not stand up for the protection of the separation of powers and our ability to do oversight, especially when conduct has happened, that is in all likelihood criminal conduct on the part of a government agency, then what do we stand for?
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Leahy: We are supposed to be the conscience of the nation. The Senator from California, Senator Feinstein, has spoken to our conscience, to every one of us, 100 senators, men and women, both parties. She has spoken to our conscience now let's stand up for this country. Let's stand up as United States senators should and as the Senator from California has.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Snowden: When you think about what has happened with the NSA over the last decade, in the post 9/11 era, the result has been an adversarial internet, sort of global free fire zone, for governments, that’s nothing that we ever asked for. It’s not what we want. And it’s something we need to protect against. What we think about the policies that have been advanced, sort of erosion of fourth amendment protections, the pro-active seizure of communications, there’s a policy of response that needs to occur, but there’s also a technical response that needs to occur. And it is the makers, it’s the thinkers, it’s the development community that can really craft those solutions and make sure we are safe.
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